Consistent emissions data for direct use of sold products

Direct-Use Product Emissions Database

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Developed with input from:

Align your downstream scope 3 emissions calculations

Fill reporting gaps, measure consistently, and report your scope 3, category 11 emissions with confidence. Developed in collaboration with the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA), the Direct-Use Product Emissions Database (DPED) combines input from leading retailers and expertise from industry, government, and non-profit organizations. With emissions data for over 180 product types, the DPED provides consistent and comparable scope 3 emissions data for your next round of reporting.

  • Industry-leading expertise

    Developed by leading retailers and industry experts

    The DPED was developed via a strategic partnership with between RILA and Optera and was guided by input from leading retailers — including Lowe’s, Target, Best Buy, The Home Depot, Tractor Supply Company, Wayfair, and Williams-Sonoma – and an ex oficio committee of industry and regulatory leaders including the European DIY Retail Association (EDRA), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR, and EPA Center for Corporate Climate Leadership.

  • Reliable product-use data

    Emissions data for 180+ product types

    To set climate goals and report reliably, retailers need access to the best available assumptions for how customers use energy-consuming products that are not currently U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR certified. The DPED solution provides emissions data for over 180 product types, including classifications like:

    • Appliances
    • Equipment
    • Electronics
    • Lighting
  • Methodology

    Collaborative input

    All emission factors and global warming potentials come from reputable sources. Emission methodologies adhere to the strictest standards for GHG accounting, life-cycle analysis, and energy-use calculation.

    When direct industry and brand-specific assumptions are unavailable, they are researched according to a hierarchy of primary, secondary, and other sources to ensure the best available data is used.

    A data quality index (DQI) is employed to log the reliability of each data point, allowing us to go back and easily improve database assumptions as better data is made available.

Annual licenses

Pricing

Single entities

Individual organizations using DPED to inform their own scope 3 calculations and reporting.

FREE

Multiple entities

Organizations using DPED to support multiple client organizations’ scope 3 calculations and reporting.

$1500

for up to 5 organizations

$4000

for up to 10 organizations

Custom pricing

for more than 10 organizations

Commercial use

Organizations using DPED as part of a commercialized product, like a software solution.

Custom pricing

Learn more

Frequently asked questions

  • Is DPED only available to members of RILA?

    While the database has been developed in close coordination with RILA, it will be available to RILA members and non-members alike.

  • What level of granularity does the database provide?

    DPED has three separate dimensions with seven total classification parameters:

    Two for the intended sector the product is sold:

    1. General industry: general consumer, commercial, or industrial
    2. Specific market: home & offices, entertainment, lawn & garden, etc.

    Four levels of product categorization, from broad to specific:

    1. Product class (ex. appliances, equipment, lighting, electronics, etc)
    2. Product family (ex. small appliances, power equipment, outdoor cooking, etc.)
    3. Product category (ex. freezers, grills, water heaters, vacuums, thermostats, etc.)
    4. Product type (ex. trail mowers (lawn mower), top-load (clothing washer), beverage cooler (refrigerator), etc.)

    One for the specific fuel type the product uses (electricity, natural gas, kerosene, dual-fuel, etc.)

  • What product categories are included?

    DPED is designed to cover direct-use product emissions, so it covers product categories that directly consume electricity or fuel. A diverse committee of retailers has determined the most relevant and appropriate categories to include. You can find a full list of product categories here.

  • What industries, markets, and sectors does the database cover?

    Most of the DPED focuses on general consumer products (residential, home, and office), but some commercial products are represented. A commercial classification includes products specifically designed for the scale of commercial and industrial customers, like a large walk-in freezer or heating a large construction site.

  • Does the tool include both Energy Star and non-Energy Star products?

    Yes, each Energy Star product is differentiated from its non-Energy Star counterpart, and many products have entries for both. Products that don’t directly state their Energy Star status are also categorized.

  • What if my products aren't exactly represented?

    We have incorporated as many possible products from a selection of retailers to get as comprehensive distribution of products as possible. During this pilot, we will collect feedback to expand to additional products and product categories in future iterations.

  • What is the geographic distribution of the database?

    Global figures are provided, but in the first version of DPED, there is greater granularity and data quality for product usage in the U.S. and Canada. Local emissions factors will be utilized when the specific location is given and will default to average values when the location is not provided.

  • How will the database be kept up to date?

    DPED will be updated on an annual basis to account for new emission factors, assumptions, new product lines,  and updated methodologies.  Any changes to DPED will be logged so that year-over-year changes can be clearly identified. After DPED is launched, the first group of users will be able to submit feedback to shape the next iteration of DPED.

  • Is the tool transparent about any assumptions, methodologies, and data sources being made?

    Yes, the sources of emission factors, assumptions, methodologies, formulae, etc. will be documented and made available to all users. We will not, however, divulge proprietary or other confidential information.

  • How can you ensure the accuracy and reliability of the final factors and resulting information?

    Optera has a 15+ year history in carbon accounting, helping the largest organizations measure, calculate, and reduce their scope 1, 2, and 3 emissions.

    All emission factors and global warming potentials come from reputable sources. Emission methodologies adhere to the strictest standards for GHG accounting, life-cycle analysis, and energy-use calculation.

    When direct industry and brand-specific assumptions are unavailable, they are researched according to a hierarchy of primary, secondary, and other sources to ensure the best available data is used.

    A data quality index (DQI) is employed to log the reliability of each data point, allowing us to go back and easily improve database assumptions as better data is made available.

Access the database